Youngest-ever Nobel Peace Prize recipient inspiration to youth wordwide

Already anAlready an international political player at the age of 17, Malala Yousafzai has become the youngest ever recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. This comes only two years after she was shot in the head during an assassination attempt by a Taliban soldier while she was on her way to school.
 
Already an international political player at the age of 17, Malala Yousafzai has become the youngest-ever recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. This comes only two years after she was shot in the head during an assassination attempt by a Taliban soldier while she was on her way home from school.
 
At the time of her injury, Yousafzai was already an outspoken propenent of access to education for girls in Pakistan. She began her political involvement at 11 as a correspondent for the BBC, blogging (under a pseudonym) about dangerous conditions in her native Swat Valley. Following a New York Times documentary about her experience, Yousafzai's public profile grew as she fearlessly gave interviews in print and on television despite threats from those who wished to silence her. Since her recovery, her noteriety has grown, along with her reach and influence. Her activism led to the ratification of Pakistan's first Right to Education Bill, earning her the first ever National Youth Peace Prize in her native country.
 
Her story serves as an inspiration for youth throughout the world, both as an example of one who has overcome extreme physical adversity, and of a young person who, under every circumstance, refuses to be silenced or marginalized despite intense societal pressure.
 
We hope to harness some of that inspiration at SCI as we continue to empower youth with the skills and connections that will hopefully allow them to influence the trajectory of their own lives and the lives of their peers. Congratulations, Malala!
 
 
 
 
 
 
We hope to harness some of that inspiration at SCI as we continue to empower youth with the skills and connections that will hopefully allow them to change the trajectory of their own lives and those of their peers. Congratulations, Malala! international political player at the age of 17, Malala Yousafzai has become the youngest ever recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. This comes only two years after she was shot in the head during an assassination attempt by a Taliban soldier while she was on her way to school.
 
At the time of her injury, Yousafzai was already an outspoken propenent of access to education for girls in Pakistan. She began her political involvement at 11 as a correspondent for the BBC, blogging about dangerous conditions in her native Swat Valley under a psuedonym. Following a New York Times documentary about her day to day life, Yousafzai's public profile grew as she fearlessly gave interviews in print and on television (also making her a Taliban target). Since her recovery, her noteriety has grown, as well as her reach and influence. Her activism led to the ratification of Pakistan's first Right to Education Bill, earning her the first ever National Youth Peace Prize in her native country.
 
Her story serves as an inspiration for youth throughout the world, both as an example of one who has overcome extreme physical adversity, and of a young person who, under every circumstance, refuses to be silenced or marginalized despite intense societal pressure.
 
We hope to harness some of that inspiration at SCI as we continue to empower youth with the skills and connections that will hopefully allow them to change the trajectory of their own lives and those of their peers. Congratulations, Malala!